Best Fitness Tracker for Biking

Best Fitness Tracker for Biking – Fitness trackers can be a great tool to upgrade your workout and enhance your health.

A variety of options are available, and each one includes a unique set of features and functions.

Be sure to consider factors like the type of fitness tracker, additional features, sport modes, and price when picking a product that’s right for you.

OVERVIEW

Certain fitness trackers may also include additional features, like GPS navigation, sleep tracking, smartphone integration, and heart rate monitoring.

There are also many types of fitness trackers available, including smartwatches, armbands, rings, chest straps, and clip-on trackers.

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ROUND UP

Some products are also designed for specific types of activities, including running, walking, swimming, or cycling, so look for a tracker that suits your needs or offers several sport-specific options.

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1.POLAR Grit

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2.HalfSun Fitness

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3.Fitbit Ionic

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4.Willful Fitness

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5.Withings Steel

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6.POLAR M430

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7.Huawei Band

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8.Samsung Galaxy

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9.Lintelek Fitness

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10.LETSCOM Smart

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Best Fitness Tracker for Biking – BUYER’S GUIDE

Cyclists’ needs for a watch or tracker are likely to be slightly different than the mainstream consumer – most likely runners and triathletes.

Features such as GPS, an altimeter and heart rate tracking will be much more useful for cyclists who are keen to track rides and analyse training data.

Bluetooth or ANT+ compatibility will mean that a watch can use data from external sensors like cadence or power meters. That sort of functionality means a watch can become a standalone alternative to a GPS computer or relying on a smartphone for activity and fitness tracking.

That said, simpler units that purely track heart rate, sleep and general movement will still offer useful data on training and general health. That may be a good supplement for a bike computer but unlikely to offer the same functionality, and will rely on a smartphone for most functionality.

Although not easy to spot, some smartwatches don’t offer compatibility with apps like Strava and MyFitnessPal. Many won’t export gpx files for use with third-party training tools.

Comfort is always important, so making sure a watch has an ergonomic fit and replaceable straps can be important. Some brands, such as Garmin, also sell handlebar mounts so the watch can be positioned in the same way as a cycling computer. However, this will of course sacrifice heart rate tracking.

Finally, keep an eye on battery life. For a long sportive where the GPS, heart rate, Bluetooth and ANT+ functions are all at work, you’ll need a sturdy battery life to avoid a power down before the finish line.

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Frequently Asked Questions

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How much do I need to spend?

If you want a watch with in-built GPS, which means you won’t rely on your phone for location data, then you’re looking at a minimum of around £80 to 100.

You can buy a simpler fitness tracker that connects to the GPS receiver in your phone for under £50 that will also record heart rate data.

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WRAP UP

Let’s be real, the market is saturated with tons of different kinds of smartwatches and activity trackers, and some of them are better at tracking certain types of activities than others.

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