Best Motherboards for Cad Workstation

Best Motherboards for Cad Workstation – In this article we looked at the best motherboards for CAD and engineering from various price ranges and for different engineering purposes.

However, as mentioned earlier, the choice of motherboard largely depends upon the processor you choose to go for as well as your budget.

ROUND UP

If you are building an Engineering PC for yourself, then a motherboard is essentially the building block.

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1.ASRock X299 Taichi

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2.ASRock LGA 2066

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3.ASRock B550

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4.ASRock X399 TAICHI

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5.MSI MPG Z390

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6.ASUS TUF Z390-Plus

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7.ASUS TUF Gaming

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8.ASUS ROG Strix Z390-I

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9.ASUS ROG Strix Z490-I

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10.MSI TRX40 PRO

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Best Motherboards for Cad Workstation – BUYER’S GUIDE

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Entry Level Setup

2D CAD isn’t too resource intensive.

If you do simple CAD designing such as 2D architectural drawings, MEP layout drawings and moderate use of software like DiaLux for calculating the lighting lux rate etc, then you don’t quite need a high end system.

In fact, you don’t even need to invest in a separate graphics card here. Since most of the layout drawings are 2D based, all you need is a powerful processor.

2D CAD designing on software like AutoCAD is primarily based on a CPU’s single core performance. Meaning, you won’t quite necessarily benefit from a higher core count as much as you would benefit from a high performance single core.

However, a higher number of cores can allow you to multitask easily and allow you to handle multiple software at the same time.

Generally, for an entry level setup we believe that you should aim the most for getting a good processor. This could be a Core i7 or a Ryzen 7 processor. Along with that, we recommend investing in about 16 GB of RAM.

If you do light simulation, 3D engineering designing than you can experiment with your budget a bit a get yourself a graphics card as well, but it is an absolute must for light and small engineering and architectural firms.

The motherboard that we would recommend here are those featuring A520 or B550 chipset for AMD builds (depending on your budget) or the B460 for Intel builds.

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Mid Range

A mid range engineering and CAD PC is essentially a high performance PC by the standard for an average consumer.

These PCs can easily feature high end Intel Core i7/ Core i9 or Ryzen 7 / Ryzen 9 processors.

A mid range CAD and engineering PC has the capacity to work on very complex 2D and 3D design as well as the ability to sufficiently render engineering simulations.

A good engineering firm can have a couple of these PCs for handling more advanced tasks.

For this sort of built we recommend looking into the motherboard with the X570 chipset for AMD or the Z490 chipset for Intel builds.

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Workstation Grade

The holy grail for any engineer is a workstation PC. These are literally compact super computers capable of handling cutting edge projects.

In general, most engineering firms do not require a workstation grade PC. Only the most advanced firms that do engineering as well as creative designing would find use of workstations.

A workstation PC has can have 64 cores and multiple GPUs. Calling this an overkill for designing simple architectural building layout design would be an understatement.

However, the premiere engineering and architectural firms can also have creative designing element to them. The thing with CAD applications particularly where 3D video simulation of an engineering project is required, and where live engineering video analysis is required, then sky is the limit for the amount of PC resources you need.

Unless you are designing and simulating something like a Jet Engine real-time, you don’t quite need a workstation PC.

A good example is where you would need to simulate all the forces acting on a jet engine or on a skyscrapper.

Also while a Single GPU is more than sufficient for most engineering applications, workstations can feature 2 or 3 specialized NVIDIA Quadro GPUs that serve the purpose of analyzing data and visualization.

So unless you are performing scientific work and processing a lot of data, you don’t quite need a workstation grade PC for your small to medium engineering firm.

But in any case, you have the X299 motherboards for Intel and the TRX40 motherboards for AMD that you can look into if you are interested in a workstation build.

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WRAP UP

In this article, we will look at the best motherboards for CAD and engineering. In doing so, we will briefly review motherboards from various price categories that would appeal to engineers and designers at different levels of expertise and budget range.

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