Best Mouse for Tennis Elbow

Best Mouse for Tennis Elbow – If you suffer from tennis elbow or any kind of pain associated pain, the first thing we recommend is that you go see a physician.

Get it checked up and take the doctors advice.

The list above was a lest of best mouse for tennis elbow from the ergonomic perspective. These are mice that people suffering from such issues tend to prefer.

OVERVIEW

You’ve probably asked yourself if an ergonomic mouse for tennis elbow is really necessary and if you should even bother searching for the perfect one.

The truth is if you spend most of your time on a computer or laptop and are concerned about the well-being of their muscles, then you need this.

Buying this kind of “tool” for daily use will definitely change your life and your hands for the better.

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ROUND UP

By choosing a good ergonomic mouse you prevent further or major injuries to your hands which can be sometimes difficult to treat.

Productivity, less strain, and comfort are crucial when it comes to the daily usage of mice, and your hands would be thankful for that.

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1.LEKVEY Mouse

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2.Ergonomic Mouse

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3.Minyue Mouse

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4.DOOMIER

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5.DELUX Mouse

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6.Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Mouse

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7.J-Tech

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8.Jelly Comb

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9.AUTLEY

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10.ZLOT Mouse

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Best Mouse for Tennis Elbow – BUYER’S GUIDE

  • Size: The size of the mouse should be an important consideration, to ensure it fits your hands comfortably. Too large, and your hands will not be rested in the right place on the mouse. Too small, and your fingers with be clinched, with a large gap between your palm and the mouse. Both are detrimental to your hands. Before purchasing your mouse, check its dimensions and compare it with your current mouse to get the proper perspective, as the product shots can be deceiving.
  • Weight: Size and weight go hand in hand when it comes to a comfortable mouse. Don’t think a mere few grams won’t make any difference- it does. Do you like the added stability of a heavier mouse, or a lightweight one that is effortless to push around? Some mouse like the Utech Gaming mouse doesn’t force you to choose, as they come with a tuning set you can add or remove to achieve the precise desired weight and resistance. Again, check the mouse’s specs for its weight before making your purchase.
  • Wireless or Not: While a wireless mouse does away with the clutter of one more cable on your desk, it isn’t without faults. It requires batteries to run (less eco friendly), usually uses a USB receiver to connect to the computer (that can be misplaced), and finally, needs to be “woken up” each time after some idle time. Think clearly about these drawbacks before settling on either a wireless or wired mouse. The biggest drawback of a wired mouse is obviously the added cable, which is especially annoying when you’re working outside.
  • Form factor: The form factor of a mouse is critical to how comfortable and ergonomic it is. The traditional horizontal mouse will feel the most familiar for most people, though it is worth giving a vertical or trackball mouse a try, especially if you are starting to feel the early effects of RSI in the arms or wrist, such as carpal tunnel syndrome or tendonitis. A joystick mouse should probably only be considered for people with an existing RSI condition, as most users find it less precise and harder to maneuver than the other three types of mice.
  • DPI Switch: DPI stands for dots per inch. A mouse with a physical DPI switch lets you easily adjust the sensitivity of the mouse cursor without any software. A high DPI setting translates into a more sensitive mouse cursor, responding to micro movements of the mouse. Gamers often demand a mouse that supports an ultra high DPI setting so it’s more responsive, though some studies have found a correlation between high DPI setting and carpal tunnel syndrome. A mouse with a physical DPI switch lets you dial down your mouse’s sensitivity on demand depending on the task at hand, and can be highly beneficial.
  • Number of Buttons: Virtually all mice come with at least two primary buttons for left and right clicking. Beyond that, is more the merrier? From an ergonomic standpoint, extra buttons- especially ones that are customizable- can eliminate having to move the mouse to perform certain tasks, reducing the chances of RSI injuries. At the minimum, look for a mouse with a browser back and forth buttons, as these are tasks commonly performed every day. The Utech Gaming Mouse comes with 12 programmable buttons on its side if there are other tasks in your daily routine that can use a shortcut.
  • Left or Right handed: Most mice featured in our guide are for right handed people, though the Trackball mouse is ambidixoul. This means it can be used by both left and right handed people. The distinct advantage of an ambidixoul mouse is that it lets you alter between hands throughout the day to operate it, spreading out the workload between your two hands and greatly reducing the chances of developing injuries. If you are disabled on on hand, an ambidixual mouse such as the Logitech Trackball Marble also lets you use your other hand to operate it. This is something to consider.
  • Price: Last but not least, price is certainly an important factor when purchasing a mouse, though not nearly as much as luxury items such as a laptop or monitor. Even the most expensive mouse certainly won’t break the bank. Do not just look at the price when elavuating the true cost of the mouse- look at the warranty period as well. An expensive mouse with a long warranty and hassle free return is arguly better than a cheap mouse that you are stuck with if it breaks in 2 months. Beyond warranty however, if a mouse delivers more comfort and better productivity than another one, that should be above all else the main deciding factor.
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WRAP UP

Tennis Elbow is a condition more officially known as Lateral Epicondylitis. It is very painful and also being a repetitive strain injury means it is caused by several factors relating to your posture.

You may suffer from this if you work long hours and maintain an uncomfortable form throughout your working day.

If you suspect, the pain originates from the use of your mouse, then you may avoid this with the use of the best mouse for Tennis Elbow based on ergonomic and popular suggestion..

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