Best Cpu for Twitch Streaming

Best Cpu for Twitch Streaming – By carefully choosing our hardware, we can have higher framerates, better performance, and a smoother stream for the money.

The two best encoding methods for streaming are Intel’s QuickSync and NVIDIA’s ShadowPlay, which are both supported by software such as OBS (Open Broadcasting Software) and XSplit. Having an Intel CPU, NVIDIA GPU, or both will give you the most options for high performance streaming.

OVERVIEW

Of course, to pick out the best CPU for streaming, you will have to do some research on your part too. However, by taking this review as your guide, you will surely find a suitable CPU.

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ROUND UP

However, these are expensive options. Thus, users looking for budget-friendly options may go for AMD Ryzen 5 3600X or AMD Ryzen 5 3600. Hence, whatever your requirement, you can choose which CPU is best for you.

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1.AMD Ryzen 3 3300X

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2.AMD Ryzen 5 3600

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3.AMD Ryzen 5 1600

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4.AMD Ryzen 3 3100

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5.AMD Ryzen 3 3200G

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6.Intel Core i9-10900K

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7.Intel Core i5-11400

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8.Intel Core i5-11600K

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9.Intel Core i5-10400F

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10.Intel Core i9-9900K

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Best Cpu for Twitch Streaming – BUYER’S GUIDE

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Content And Budget

In an ideal world, everyone eager to experiment with streaming has a large budget to sink into obtaining a high-end CPU. The reality of most budding streamers means that budget will have the most significant impact on what CPU they opt for. This isn’t necessarily as prohibitive as it sounds: the type of content also has a part to play in how efficient a CPU will be.

Streaming the most demanding games on a single setup PC requires a high-end CPU to match, while putting the world to rights in a cozy creator-to-audience stream is more than possible with a more affordable CPU option.

As such, we recommend curbing the natural desire to opt for the very best out there, and instead, buying within your means and for the content you plan to stream. All the CPUs above are perfectly suitable for streaming, so don’t hesitate to jump down to a lower price bracket if it suits your plans.

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AMD Vs. Intel

Barring some odd quirk, you’ll be well aware of AMD and Intel’s tussle when it comes to processors. For better or worse, the retail space is dominated by the two chip powerhouses, limiting the choice of which streaming-fit CPU to one of the two. It’s not necessarily a bad thing, but choosing one camp over the other can very much feel like picking sides.

While we aren’t here to side with one or the other, they each have their strong points, and arguably the race has never been so closely fought after years of Intel leading the charge. A few years ago, the thrifty builder invariably veered towards AMD’s more competitively priced products, while those eager for all-out performance threw their cash at Intel. Intel’s dominance, especially when it comes to gaming performance, isn’t what it once was with AMD products now more or less on par, if not better (looking at you multithreading).

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Single/Dual PC Streaming Setup

Running a single or dual PC streaming setup places significantly different demands on the CPU and should mostly guide your final decision.

Should you fall into the dual PC camp, then you have some leeway when it comes to the chip for the PC charged with encoding and streaming video. In this case, a lower-spec and more affordable CPU is more than enough (unless you’re dipping into quality higher than 1080p), allowing you to invest in a high-end CPU for the PC used for the actual gaming.

For single PC setups, we recommend going big and spending more money on the CPU to ensure there’s enough power there to handle encoding as well as games or other CPU hungry applications you may want to incorporate into your broadcasts. Not doing so invariably leads to dropped frames and choppy in-game FPS, a perfect recipe for bleeding viewers and sapping the enjoyment out of streaming. A CPU with the chops to allocate sufficient resources to both is crucial.

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Frequently Asked Questions

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How did streaming work before all this fancy hardware encoding?

Like streaming a video game console, people used to stream PC games using two computers. One computer would be dedicated to playing the game, while the other would be equipped with a capture card and would run the streaming software. Back in those days, the encoders weren’t nearly as sophisticated, and required more of the system to run in the first place. It wasn’t uncommon to dedicate an entire Core2Duo CPU to the task of streaming.

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WRAP UP

Streaming is slowly becoming a hobby for many gamers. Why play alone when you can share your gameplay with people from all over the world on Twitch, Mixer, or YouTube? Sounds fun and can get you new friends. Also, it’s cool when you have someone to share your rants with when things don’t go your way. For casual streaming, set at 720p/30fps, with a low bitrate, you can use almost any modern CPU with 4 cores and 8 threads.

But for more serious streaming hobbyists 720p/30fps at, let’s say, 2500Kbps doesn’t cut it. If you need a CPU to handle your 1080p streams in high bitrate, a capable CPU with lots of cores will be of great help.

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